New York City Panel for Educational Policy

The Panel for Educational Policy of the Department of Education of the City School District of the City of New York,[1] abbreviated as the Panel for Educational Policy and also known as the New York City Board of Education, is the governing body of the New York City Department of Education.[2][3] The members of the board are appointed by the mayor and by the five borough presidents.

Panel for Educational Policy of the Department of Education of the City School District of the City of New York[1]
NYC Board of Education seal.jpg
Former seal of the Board of Education
Board overview
Preceding board
  • New York City Board of Education
JurisdictionNew York City
HeadquartersTweed Courthouse
Board executive
  • Vanessa Leung, Chair
Parent departmentNew York City Department of Education
Key document
Websiteschools.nyc.gov/about-us/leadership/panel-for-education-policy

HistoryEdit

Independent Board (1842-2002)Edit

The New York State legislature established the New York City Board of Education in 1842.[4]

Mayoral Control (2002 - Present)Edit

On June 30, 2002, Mayor Bloomberg secured authority over the schools from the New York State legislature, which began the era of "mayoral control" over the city schools. The New York Supreme Court elaborates:[3]

By chapter 91 of the Laws of 2002, the Education Law was amended so as to radically restructure the governance of the school district of the City of New York. The amendment provided, among other things, that the Mayor of New York was empowered to appoint a Chancellor who would preside over a Board of Education which was to be expanded from 7 to 13 members, the majority of which were also to be appointed by the Mayor of the City of New York. Five Board members are selected by the Borough Presidents. Although that legislation itself made no specific reference to a "Department of Education of the City of New York," the bylaws subsequently adopted by the Board provide that this 13-member body "shall be known as the Panel for Educational Policy," which together with the Chancellor and other school employees is designated as the "Department of Education of the City of New York."

On June 30, 2009, the New York State Senate declined to renew the mayor's full authority over the school system. In particular, State Senate Democratic leader John Sampson, of Brooklyn, opposed the extension of mayoral control. The authority reverted for a time to the Board of Education, but mayoral control was restored until 2015 in a vote on August 6, 2009.[5] The actual city agency running the schools remains the New York City Department of Education.

On January 29th, 2021, 2 days after the January 27th, 2021 panel meeting, Borough President James Oddo pulled Peter Calandrella, the Staten Island Representative to the Panel for Educational Policy whom was appointed to back in 2016, due to Mr. Calandrella voted against a contract extension for the administration of the controversial City Gifted & Talented exam. The Borough President statement mentioned the removal of Peter Calandrella was "not because of the substance of the vote, but because it went against what he, his staff and Calandrella had agreed on the night before". A Letter from the entire Panel sent to Borough President Oddo requesting him to change his decision to remove Peter Calandrella from the PEP, however the removal was scheduled to be conducted on February 09th, 2021.[6] On March 9th, 2021, it was announced that Borough President Oddo appointed Jaclyn Tacoronte, a local business owner, to replace Peter Calandrella.[7]

MembersEdit

There are 15^ members of the panel. Each of the five borough presidents appoints one member, and the remaining eight are appointed by the mayor. The chancellor is an ex-officio on the panel and with no voting power along with the student representatives on the panel.[8]

Voting MembersEdit

Non-Voting MembersEdit

Analysis and criticismEdit

In 2011, Panel for Educational Policy member Patrick Sullivan (who was appointed by then Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer in 2007[10]) suggested changing the system to have only six mayoral appointees, and that appointees should have fixed terms; additionally, he stated "For us not to have the same role in our kids' education as people who live in the suburbs or Middle America is patronizing."[11]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Bylaws of the Panel for Educational Policy of the Department of Education of the City School District of the City of New York". New York City Department of Education. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  2. ^ Education Law § 2590-b(a); "The board of education of the city school district of the city of New York is hereby continued. Such board of education shall consist of thirteen members: one member to be appointed by each borough president of the city of New York; seven members to be appointed by the mayor of the city of New York; and the chancellor. The chancellor shall serve as the chairperson of the city board. ..."
  3. ^ a b Nacipucha v. City of New York, 18 Misc 3d 846, 850 (Sup Ct, Bronx County 2008).
  4. ^ Ment, David M. (2008). "Guide to the Records of the New York City Board of Education" (PDF). New York City Department of Records. p. 155. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  5. ^ Medina, Jennifer (August 6, 2009). "N.Y. Senate Renews Mayor's Power to Run Schools". The New York Times.
  6. ^ "Oddo pulls appointee from education panel after vote on gifted program testing". silive. 2021-01-30. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  7. ^ "Oddo names new appointee to NYC education panel". silive. 2021-03-09. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  8. ^ "PEP Members". New York City Department of Education. Retrieved 2021-06-14.
  9. ^ a b "https://twitter.com/kathyparkprice/status/1387419341101146115". Twitter. Retrieved 2021-06-14. External link in |title= (help)
  10. ^ "Borough President Stringer Announces Appointment to Panel for Educational Policy" (Press release). Scott Stringer. 2007-06-22. Archived from the original on 2012-02-13. Retrieved 2011-09-12.
  11. ^ Featherstone, Liza (September 2011), "Report Card: Our Fake School Board", Brooklyn Rail, retrieved 2011-09-12

External linksEdit