Jewelry Trade Center

The Jewelry Trade Center is a 59-story mixed-use skyscraper located in the Silom Road gemstone district of Bangkok, Thailand. Designed by Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum, the building was completed in 1996. At 220.7 metres (724 ft)[1] it is currently the eighth-tallest building in Thailand. It was the tallest building in Thailand when it was completed.

Jewelry Trade Center
1B6E46E6Bangkok Jewellery Trade Centre 2019.jpg
Jewelry Trade Center, being partially blocked by a building of Bangkok Christian College
General information
Location919/1 Silom Road, Bang Rak, Bangkok 10500, Thailand
Completed1996
Height220.7 m (724 ft)[1]
Technical details
Floor count58
Design and construction
ArchitectHellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum

The center is the largest center for selling, sourcing and distributing jewelry in Bangkok and one of the largest such centers in Asia. It contains a fully equipped gem-testing laboratory operated by the Asian Institute of Gemological Sciences (AIGS) as well as a gemological school, also operated by AIGS. The Bangkok Fashion Mall located in the building's lower plaza is a large retail space for outlet stores featuring clothing, shoes and accessories. Suppliers of loose gemstones, rough stones and jewelry from around the world are also in the retail areas of the building. The building contains banks, a food court, coffee shops, a convenience store, a health club, a post office, a customs office, and residential condominiums.[2]

The center is built on a plot of land of 9.5 rai, or approximately 4.5 acres (18,000 m2). Partners in the project included Henry Ho (of Bijoux Holdings), Samrit Chirathivat (late CEO of the Central Group, later replaced by Vanchai Chirathivat), Vichai Maleenont (of Bangkok Entertainment, operator of TV Channel 3), and Chatri Sophonpanich (CEO of Bangkok Bank).[3]

Coordinates: 13°43′22″N 100°31′12″E / 13.72278°N 100.52000°E / 13.72278; 100.52000

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Records
Preceded by
Sinn Sathorn Tower
Tallest building in Thailand
220.7 m (724 ft)

1996–1997
Succeeded by
Baiyoke Tower II