Disney's Activity Center

Disney's Activity Center are a series of games released by Disney Interactive which provide customers with various activities and minigames to be completed, using aspects of their licensed property.

Disney's Activity Center
Disney's Aladdin Activity Center.jpg
The 1994 video game Disney's Aladdin Activity Center
Developer(s)Disney Software / Disney Interactive
Gryphon Software
Publisher(s)Disney Software / Disney Interactive
Platform(s)Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, PlayStation (console)
First releaseDisney's Aladdin Activity Center
1994
Latest releaseDisney-Pixar's Monsters, Inc. Activity Center
2002

DevelopmentEdit

Disney Interactive was founded in 1994 via the acquisition of Sanctuary Woods, to develop and market a range of interactive entertainment based on their properties.[1] The company's distribution was handled by Disney division Buena Vista. Ex-Sanctuary Woods' 35 staff in their local Victoria, British Columbia office became a small part of Disney Interactive's 300 employees, handling the programming, sound and graphic design, and art. Meanwhile, Disney Interactive managed the animation and creative from their Burbank head office.[2] The developers aimed to have a "true and fair representation of the original property", having the feature films' directors and producers working alongside their artists and designers.[3] The developer was one of several interactive divisions of film studios sprouting at the time, including Universal Interactive Studios, Turner Interactive, Fox Interactive, Sony Imagesoft, and Imagination Pilots (MGM).[4] Disney Interactive felt the initial success of the Activity and Storybook games would boost the success of their Learning Series (kicked off with Ready to Read with Pooh) and the first game from their creativity line Disney's Draw & Paint. [5]

List of gamesEdit

Game Year of release Notes
Disney's Activity Center: Aladdin November 1994[6] The game's designers and artists worked hand in hand with the film's directors and producers.[7]

The title sold 100,000 copies by 18 February 1995.[7]

Disney's Activity Center: The Lion King 1995 Ryan O'Donohue replaces Jonathan Taylor Thomas as the voice of Young Simba because Thomas was busy acting as Tom Sawyer for Disney's live action production of Tom and Huck.
Disney's Activity Center: Toy Story 1996
Disney's Activity Center: The Little Mermaid 1998
Disney's Activity Center: The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride 1998
Disney's Activity Center: A Bug's Life 1998
Disney's Activity Center: Beauty and the Beast 1999
Disney's Activity Center: Tarzan 1999
Disney's Activity Center: Toy Story 2 1999
Disney's Activity Center: Winnie the Pooh 2000 Based on the story Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day[8]
Disney's Activity Center: Dinosaur May 16, 2000[9]
Disney's Activity Center: The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea 2000
Disney's Activity Center: 102 Dalmatians 2001
Disney's Activity Center: The Emperor's New Groove 2001
Disney's Activity Center: Atlantis: The Lost Empire 2001
Disney's Activity Center: Tigger March 2001[10]
Disney's Activity Center: Monsters, Inc. 2002

Critical receptionEdit

On AllGame, Disney's The Lion King Activity Center received 3.5 stars,[11] Disney's Aladdin Activity Center received 3.5 stars,[12] Disney's Toy Story Activity Center received 3.5 stars,[13] Disney's Winnie the Pooh Activity Center received 3.5 stars,[14] Disney's 102 Dalmatians Activity Center received 3.5 stars,[15] Disney's Dinosaur Activity Center received 2 stars,[16] Disney's Tigger Activity Center received 3 stars,[17] and Disney's Tarzan Activity Center received 3 stars.[18]

The Boston Herald thought that by 1999, the titles had become predictable cash-ins to Disney movies, who would generally have voice actor replacements and the same structure as previous games in the series; the newspaper also commented that Activity Center games were one part of the triad (along with the "action game" and the "print studio." that Disney Interactive would generally release with each new film.[19] Knight Ridder thought the Tarzan triad weren't groundbreaking yet fun enough to keep kids entertained, deeming the Activity Center as a pleasant diversion.[20] The Herald News thought the series was catered toward children and kept them in mind during the design process.[21] The Washington Post considered the games as tie-ins that Disney was cranking out at the time, strictly for fans of the film properties.[22] The Los Angeles Times noted the games featured an online component, though noted the Internet content wasn't assured as safe by Disney.[23]

Commercial performanceEdit

Aladdin was the 3rd most popular education game in the week ended December 2, 1995,[24] and 4th most popular in the Macintosh category in the week ended December 9, 1995.[25] The Lion King was the most popular title in the Macintosh category in the week ended February 3, 1996,[26] the 2nd most popular title in the Macintosh category in the week ended March 5, 1996,[27] and the 8th most popular in the week ended May 4, 1996.[28] In the month of May 1997, Toy Story was the 3rd top-selling software in Home Education (MS-DOS/Windows), while Aladdin, and The Lion King were the 4th and 8th best-selling under HOME EDUCATION (MaCINTOSH).[29] Tarzan was the 4th top selling education title in the week ended July 17, 1999.[30]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ October 21, Ian Edwards; 1996. "Special Report: Interactive Production: Disney interacting with Victoria". Retrieved 2018-12-29.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ October 21, Ian Edwards; 1996. "Special Report: Interactive Production: Disney interacting with Victoria". Retrieved 2018-12-29.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (1995-02-18). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 69. disney activity center interactive studios.
  4. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (1995-02-18). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 69. disney activity center interactive studios.
  5. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (1997-02-22). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  6. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (1995-02-18). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 69.
  7. ^ a b Inc, Nielsen Business Media (1995-02-18). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 69. Disney Activity Center billboard.
  8. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (2000-02-19). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. p. 72. Disney Activity Center billboard.
  9. ^ "GameDaily - Interactive Entertainment Industry News for 4-28-00". 2001-05-21. Archived from the original on 2001-05-21. Retrieved 2018-12-31.
  10. ^ Inc, Nielsen Business Media (2001-02-17). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  11. ^ "Disney's The Lion King Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  12. ^ "Disney's Aladdin Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  13. ^ "Disney's Toy Story Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  14. ^ "Disney's Winnie the Pooh Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  15. ^ "Disney's 102 Dalmatians Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  16. ^ "Disney's Dinosaur Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  17. ^ "Disney's Tigger Activity Center - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  18. ^ "Disney's Tarzan Activity Center [Disney's Classics] - Overview - allgame". allgame.com. Retrieved 2014-08-04.
  19. ^ "Predictable Disney trots out Tarzan; Tarzan Activity Center, for ages 4-8; Tarzan Print Studio, for all ages; and Tarzan Action Game, for age 8 and up. Disney Interactive, $20-$30. CD-ROM for Windows 95/98 2 stars". 1999-08-01. Archived from the original on 2018-11-17. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  20. ^ "St. Petersburg Times, Fla., Software Reviews Column". 1999-07-14. Archived from the original on 2018-11-17. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  21. ^ "Kids get creative with 'Kid Pix'". 2001-04-12. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)[dead link]
  22. ^ "Screen Shots". 1999-07-16. Archived from the original on 2018-11-19. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  23. ^ GUDMUNDSEN, JINNY (2000-12-14). "One Disney Activity Center Is Groovy; the Other's a Dog". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2018-12-29.
  24. ^ "BESTSELLERS". 1995-12-11. Archived from the original on 2018-11-15. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  25. ^ "BEST SELLERS". 1995-12-18. Archived from the original on 2018-11-15. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  26. ^ "Bestsellers". 1996-02-12. Archived from the original on 2016-10-08. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  27. ^ "BESTSELLERS". 1996-03-11. Archived from the original on 2018-11-18. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  28. ^ "BEST SELLERS". 1996-05-13. Archived from the original on 2016-10-08. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  29. ^ "Top-Selling Software March 1997". Retrieved 2018-12-29.
  30. ^ "Bestsellers". 1999-08-09. Archived from the original on 2016-03-06. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)