Calycoceras

  (Redirected from Calycoceras guerangeri)

Calycoceras is an extinct genus of cephalopods belonging to the subclass Ammonoidea and family Acanthoceratidae that lived during the Cenomanian stage of the Late Cretaceous, 100-94 Mya.[1] Their shells had ornate ribs.[2]

Calycoceras
Temporal range: Cretaceous
Gasteropods - Ammonites - Calycoceras (Newboldiceras) spinosa.JPG
Calycoceras asiaticum spinosum, Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) from Madagascar, abt. 94 Mya
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Cephalopoda
Subclass: Ammonoidea
Order: Ammonitida
Family: Acanthoceratidae
Subfamily: Acanthoceratinae
Genus: Calycoceras
Hyatt, 1900
Species
  • See text
Synonyms
  • Newboldiceras

SpeciesEdit

  • C. algeriense Kennedy & Gale, 2017
  • C. annulatum Collignon, 1964
  • C. asiaticum (Jimbo, 1894)[3]
    • C. a. asiaticum (Jimbo, 1894)[3]
    • C. a. spinosum (Kossmat, 1897)[3]
  • C. besairieri Collignon, 1937
  • C. boreale Kennedy, Cobban & Landman, 1996 [4]
  • C. dromense (Thomel, 1972) [5]
  • C. cenomanense (d’Archiac, 1846)
  • C. navicularis Mantell, 1822
  • C. orientale Matsumoto, Saito & Fukada [6]
  • C. paucinodatum (Crick) [7]
  • C. tarrantense[8]

DistributionEdit

Calycoceras species may be found in the Cretaceous of Angola, Antarctica, Canada (British Columbia), France, Germany, Japan, Nigeria, Oman, Russia, the United Kingdom, United States (Alaska, Arizona, Kansas, New Mexico, South Dakota, Utah) [3]

C. asiaticum may be found in the Cenomanian of Canada, Southern England, northern and southern France, Spain, Romania, Bulgaria, Tunisia, Madagascar, south India and Japan.[3][9]

C. cenomanense may be found in the Cenomanian of United Kingdom, France and Madagascar.[10][11][12][13]

 
Calycoceras orientale, Late Cretaceous from Japan.

DescriptionEdit

Shells of Calycoceras asiaticum may reach a diameter of about 20 centimetres (7.9 in). The larger phragmocones may reach 59–72 millimetres (2.3–2.8 in) in diameter. Coiling is moderately involute. All ribs show strong subspinose tubercles. C. asiaticum asiaticum and C. asiaticum spinosum are very similar, the latter has much more robust tuberculation.[3][14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack Sepkoski's Online Genus Database – Cephalopodes
  2. ^ Ammonites
  3. ^ a b c d e f William James Kennedy, Herbert Christian Klinger (2010) Cretaceous faunas from Zululand and Natal, South Africa. The ammonite subfamily Acanthoceratinae de Grossouvre, 1894
  4. ^ Global Names Index
  5. ^ AMNH
  6. ^ UMUT
  7. ^ Smithsonian Institutions
  8. ^ The Paleobiology Database
  9. ^ Paleobiology Database
  10. ^ P. Moreau, I.H. Francis, W.J. Kennedy Cenomanian ammonites from northern aquitaine
  11. ^ William James Kennedy, Ireneusz Walaszczyk, Andrew S. Gale, Krzysztof Dembicz, Tomasz Praszkier - Lower and Middle Cenomanian ammonites from the Morondava Basin, Madagascar
  12. ^ W. J. Kennedy 1971. - Cenomanian Ammonites from Southern England. Special Papers in Palaeontology Number 8. v + 133 pp., 64 pls, 5 tables. The Palaeontological Association, London
  13. ^ Sepkoski, Jack Sepkoski's Online Genus Database – Cephalopodes
  14. ^ Ammonites